Good Jobs

Successful economies make things. And successful economies take shape when government, business, and labour strategize together about what to make and how best to make it. Germany’s economy is a success because of this kind of strategizing. And Japan’s. And Sweden’s.

Canada’s economy could make things, too. We’re blessed with huge natural resources and a population of workers who are healthy, smart, and motivated. Just imagine what we could make: world-class windmills, solar panels, tidal turbines, ice breakers, irrigation systems, affordable vaccines and pharmaceuticals, next-generation communications systems and IT, educational curricula and mass culture.

We need a "Modern Industrial Strategy"

We could focus our economy on any of these things or on whatever else we can imagine. But it will take investment: we’ll have to design a good strategy and then commit to putting it in action.

Unfortunately, we’re electing politicians who starve themselves of resources to invest in a modern industrial strategy by cutting corporate and wealth taxes. Worse, we’re electing politicians who sign off on trade deals like the North American Free Trade Act or the Trans-Pacific Partnership that actually outlaw co-ordinated industrial strategies, ensuring corporations free rein to pursue their own strategies. Overwhelmingly, the evidence shows that corporate strategies are most often focussed on quick and safe profit at the expense of all else, including environmental and social costs and even longer-term gain.

These strategies lead directly to stagnant wages, temporary and part-time jobs, and exploitative schemes like the Temporary Foreign Workers program.

It’s time for a new strategy. A strategy that excites and inspires us, and that puts people and nature ahead of short-term profit.

Congratulations on your new HQ, Google, now please pay your taxes

On January 14, Google, along side Prime Minister Trudeau, announced that it was setting up the Google Development shop in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario. This decision will create 350 high-tech jobs in the area. 

Canadians for Tax Fairness welcomes the news but remains concerned about Google’s record in paying corporate taxes in countries in which they operate.

Small business tax rates used as a loophole

Very few people feel that well-off accountants, lawyers, or dentists should pay a lower rate of tax than the rest of us. But as a recent Toronto Sun column points out, the combination of personal services corporations and lower tax rates for small businesses are allowing many well-heeled professionals to avoid paying their share.

As the article points out, the combined federal and provincial tax rate for small businesses in Ontario is 11 per cent. For high-income individuals its 46 per cent.

GJ

Successful economies make things. And successful economies take shape when government, business, and labour strategize together about what to make and how best to make it. Germany’s economy is a success because of this kind of strategizing. And Japan’s. And Sweden’s.

Conservatives spend $525 million to create jobs outside Canada

The Conservative government is providing Volkswagen AG with $525 million in financing to expand factories in Mexico and the Southern United States. The money is being provided by Export Development Canada. No conditions are attached to the financing.

In exchange for giving Volkswagen $525 million to create jobs nowhere near Canada, what do Canadians get? Not a guarantee of work. Instead, all Canadian companies get is a “real chance to be considered” for contracts to supply parts.

Why one of Canada’s big banks is calling for greater income equality

Published by the Toronto Star on December 19, 2014

By: Ryan Meili

A moneylender sees the light, discovering a spirit of giving and generosity. It’s a classic Christmas tale of redemption — and redistribution — but this year the convert in question appears to be one of Canada’s biggest banks. In a recent report, economists at TD Bank laid out “The Case for Leaning Against Income Inequality,” pointing out the dangers of the widening divide, and giving some strong suggestions on how to turn the tide.

The TD bank heads in the right direction, income inequality hurts our economy

A new report from the TD Bank reinforces the All Together Now! campaign message: income inequality hurts our economy. 

In its new report, 

 

it's not the first time TD Bank has come out with support for reducing income inequality. child care. 

 

He also acknowledges that "right-to-work" states in the U.S. are driving down wages, ones that used to be middle-income jobs have now slipped down while knowledge jobs continue to be paid a higher rate. Canadian employers feel pressure to follow suit. 

 

"Businesses just want to increase their profits; it's up to the government to make sure they distribute enough of those profits so workers have the money to buy the goods they produce. It's no mystery — the less poverty, the more commerce."

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